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what needs to be done to increase the fan base and popularity of unlimited hydroplane racing

I have tried to start a discussion about the "state of the sport" and what needs to be done to increase its fan base, which will result in greater sponsor interest, more media exposure, more races, TV covereage, etc., etc., etc.

I have already given my thoughts on the discussion tab of the H1 Unlimited website, but I would like to hear more input from more fans, and more input from H1 on their plans. Comments?

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John, it's great to hear from you. I hope all is well! I agree wholeheartedly that the vintage boats need to be an integral part of race day, or race weekend. I think the progress the Museum has made is nothing short of miraculous when you look at the historic boats that have been brought back to life and have the run the course in Seattle (formerly) and currently in Tri-Cities. It absolutely drives me crazy that Seafair thinks there isn't a place for the vintage boats on race day. They are a huge draw with the fans in TC, and I recall them being even more popular in Seattle -- the new Wahoo certainly was two years ago. Perhaps you or someone involved with the museum can shed more light on what went sideways with Seafair when it comes to running more vintage hulls. Is it simply because they say there isn't room in the pits and that's it? As I stated earlier, this sport has as rich of a history as Major League Baseball, Boxing and Horse Racing. Hardly any other 'professional' sports can span over a century of continuous activity, and Unlimited hydroplane racing is one of them. Right now it seems it's up to the individual race site to decide if they want to bring in the vintage hulls or not. Would it be a good idea (if money was not an object) to wrap them more into the entire program that H1 brings to the table? I think so...
Tony, you're preaching to the choir, dude! I'd love to see the vintage boats tied in with more H1 sites, especially Detroit, Madison, and San Diego. As for what went "sideways" as you say, all I can speak to is what happened during the four years of the PEMCO Classic (1999-2002). It's not appropriate to share too much detail, but I think it's generally known or presumed that PEMCO paid a significant sponsorship fee to Seafair, and that the Museum felt it was not given a sufficient portion of that money in light of what it cost to prepare and run its boats. Being part of the vintage 1962 Bardahl team, I now have a better sense of what it costs to prepare, transport, run, and maintain a boat. Even for exhibitions run at prudent speeds, the cost is not an insignificant one.

It is becoming increasingly apparent to me that:

 

We're all too close to the sport and seem to be trying to preserve the things we like to the exclusion of the changes that might be required to make it prosper. I admit I'd love nothing more than to turn back the clock, have a picnic on the shores of the Lake (or river, or bay.. whatever) with no admission fee and listen to the roar of piston-powered open cockpit, round nose hydroplanes. It ain't gonna happen... You can't go home again

 

But wait! There's more to this than I might have given serious thought. (and to be sure, I am not about to offer the definitive solution here) A lot of what I'm reading in these posts reminds me, as an old Ferrari, Porsche, Corvette, Cobra and - truthfully -  an MG, Triumph and Corvair kind of guy, that perhaps what we need to do is not so much try to bring our sport into the 21st century, but to figure out some way to get what we seem to want as a part of a comprehensive program.

 

In other words, why not keep the tradition and rich history (okay, and noise) of the old boats alive by making them a part of a total weekend event? Or even a stand alone event?  Yes, I know I'm not the first to think of this, but I'm reminded of the Monterey Historic Automobile Races, a vision put to practice by one Steven Earle. When I first started attending this annual event in the late 70s, it was a very clubby sort of an affair where people with old race cars for which no class remained, could have the opportunity to take them on the track and blow out the cobwebs, while allowing enthusiasts like myself to enjoy the sounds of old V-12s and the sight of famous old cars.

 

I'm starting to see seeds of a similar resurgence in the increasing attention to the vintage events, sanctioned by APBA and with promotional efforts by communities like Chelan's "Mahogany and Merlot" celebration and the recent Diamond Cup Revival/Regatta in Couer d'Alene.

 

I don't even suggest I have a plan for this, but I can say, from years of attendance, that the Monterey Historics Weekend has probably become the most attended weekend event on the Monterey Penninsula. (warts and all). It has grown to the point, to paraphrase Mr Berra, "It's become so crowded, no body goes there anymore".

 

So, just an idea, based on what I've seen develop. Perhaps it might be the historic elements of our sport that ought to be supporting or paying tribute to the modern version. Maybe we should build on the current vintage revival, make that the feature - including not only unlimiteds, but 7-Liters, the Y-class 48's, the 280s, et al.

 

Then as part of the program, roll out - or float out I suppose - some examples of the current crop of 200MPH+ unlimiteds as part of a special presentation, rather than have the vintage boats be a small adjunct to the H1 races?

 

Maybe we've been thinking this whole idea backwards. Let H1 get on with their business without them trying to figure out or plan for some way to pay homage to the old boats - especially at the newer venues (Qatar, China..) where I suspect most people couldn't care less about them. 

 

In other words, let's let H1 get on with their dynamic sport and let those of us who would rather have thunder and history take center stage (and, with I suppose APBA) figure out how to grow the vintage aspects of boat racing alone. We may be spending too much time and effort trying to put the two groups into harmony to the conflicting and counter-productive efforts of both.

 

Just my opinion...This is a forum,right? Maybe somebody should give Steve Earle a call to find out how he made the Monterey Historics such a great event.....

 

Philip,

 

I love the vintage unlimiteds too, but, unfortunately, they are all based at the museum in Seattle, which doesn't help the events in Detroit, Madison, or the former Evansville thunder.

 

I still think the sport needs an overhaul: 1) make it a one day race as it always was before local groups tried to turn a 10 boat race into a two day event; 2) stop dragging the program out--no more than 60 minutes between heats; 3) level the playing field for all by standardizing propellers, then skid fins, etc. so that the race is truly competitive for all, not just a one or two boat contest.  If the H1 people want to bring fans back, including the younger audience, they HAVE to make the program shorter and more competitive.  Only the "old timer diehards" like you and I, will continue to come if they refuse to update the show.  If they don't they will continue to lose paying customers and race sites!  H1 never publishes paid attendance, but I'm willing to bet all that the trend is DOWN!

Philip Lampman said:

It is becoming increasingly apparent to me that:

 

We're all too close to the sport and seem to be trying to preserve the things we like to the exclusion of the changes that might be required to make it prosper. I admit I'd love nothing more than to turn back the clock, have a picnic on the shores of the Lake (or river, or bay.. whatever) with no admission fee and listen to the roar of piston-powered open cockpit, round nose hydroplanes. It ain't gonna happen... You can't go home again

 

But wait! There's more to this than I might have given serious thought. (and to be sure, I am not about to offer the definitive solution here) A lot of what I'm reading in these posts reminds me, as an old Ferrari, Porsche, Corvette, Cobra and - truthfully -  an MG, Triumph and Corvair kind of guy, that perhaps what we need to do is not so much try to bring our sport into the 21st century, but to figure out some way to get what we seem to want as a part of a comprehensive program.

 

In other words, why not keep the tradition and rich history (okay, and noise) of the old boats alive by making them a part of a total weekend event? Or even a stand alone event?  Yes, I know I'm not the first to think of this, but I'm reminded of the Monterey Historic Automobile Races, a vision put to practice by one Steven Earle. When I first started attending this annual event in the late 70s, it was a very clubby sort of an affair where people with old race cars for which no class remained, could have the opportunity to take them on the track and blow out the cobwebs, while allowing enthusiasts like myself to enjoy the sounds of old V-12s and the sight of famous old cars.

 

I'm starting to see seeds of a similar resurgence in the increasing attention to the vintage events, sanctioned by APBA and with promotional efforts by communities like Chelan's "Mahogany and Merlot" celebration and the recent Diamond Cup Revival/Regatta in Couer d'Alene.

 

I don't even suggest I have a plan for this, but I can say, from years of attendance, that the Monterey Historics Weekend has probably become the most attended weekend event on the Monterey Penninsula. (warts and all). It has grown to the point, to paraphrase Mr Berra, "It's become so crowded, no body goes there anymore".

 

So, just an idea, based on what I've seen develop. Perhaps it might be the historic elements of our sport that ought to be supporting or paying tribute to the modern version. Maybe we should build on the current vintage revival, make that the feature - including not only unlimiteds, but 7-Liters, the Y-class 48's, the 280s, et al.

 

Then as part of the program, roll out - or float out I suppose - some examples of the current crop of 200MPH+ unlimiteds as part of a special presentation, rather than have the vintage boats be a small adjunct to the H1 races?

 

Maybe we've been thinking this whole idea backwards. Let H1 get on with their business without them trying to figure out or plan for some way to pay homage to the old boats - especially at the newer venues (Qatar, China..) where I suspect most people couldn't care less about them. 

 

In other words, let's let H1 get on with their dynamic sport and let those of us who would rather have thunder and history take center stage (and, with I suppose APBA) figure out how to grow the vintage aspects of boat racing alone. We may be spending too much time and effort trying to put the two groups into harmony to the conflicting and counter-productive efforts of both.

 

Just my opinion...This is a forum,right? Maybe somebody should give Steve Earle a call to find out how he made the Monterey Historics such a great event.....

 

Tim, I think you miss my point. What I'm trying to suggest here is to stop trying to combine the H1 Unlimited Events with the appearance of a few vintage exhibition laps. Let H1 get on with their own business and work to promote what, frankly is an exciting sport that needs some promotion and new venues.

 

Let's focus on the vintage events as stand-alone events. And i'm not just talking about unlimiteds. So what if a lot of of the old "U" boats are in Seattle. Thank god for that. So are a lot of the great limiteds, including the flatbottom racers, like Super Stocks, K-Boats, Cracker Boxes, and even drag boats. And why not make room for the outboards? I'm not suggesting we unveil an entire new nationwide series. Just try some things with the vintage boats and see what works.And let's make it part of a festival, with some commercial activities from local marinas, wineries and orchards and resorts...

 

Let's take what's already started, albeit in tentative steps, and support and help build on the events in Chelan and Couer d-Alene. Let's celebrate the old boats, make them part of an entire weekend festival at various venues and see what happens. Sure, you're right, many of the boats are out here in Seattle. For that reason alone I think we have the nucleus of a great concept.

 

Let me again refer to the Monterey Historics weekend. Were you thinking perhaps that all the vintage Ferraris, Bugattis, Alfas and Corvettes were garaged in Monterey? No, taking a page from the film "Field of Dreams", build it and they will come. If we need to build it in Seattle as a beginning, let's do it. Once there with nough interest in bringing back the old boats, I think the interest in them will grow and a lot of them will be rebuilt, restored and celebrated.

I realize that such a concept may not be what you had in mind when you made your original post and got this discussion started, but a lot of the ideas presented seem to suggest we need to somehow try to figure put how to gain new fans, but so many of the ideas also seem to suggest let's figure out how to do it without losing the elements of the sport so many of us grew up with. An honorable idea, but one I can't figure out how to satisfy.

 

So, again. let H1 get on with their own program, let minds brighter than my one, figure out how to make their sport successful and the rest of us simply get on with the things we seem to enjoy, the old boats, with all the noises and thrills and stories and legends that are part of the package.

 

Am I making any sense here? Let's begin in Seattle where we (I assume) have the greatest number of vintage boats, work toward building additional events - indeed festivals - in Chelan and elsewhere and go from there. The small, yet enthusiastic turnout of the vintage limiteds last October in Chelan, together with a wonderful turnout of old vintage runabouts made for a great weekend celebration.

 

Okay, I no longer have fingerprints... I'm going to bed.



Tim Matyn said:

Philip,

 

I love the vintage unlimiteds too, but, unfortunately, they are all based at the museum in Seattle, which doesn't help the events in Detroit, Madison, or the former Evansville thunder.

 

I still think the sport needs an overhaul: 1) make it a one day race as it always was before local groups tried to turn a 10 boat race into a two day event; 2) stop dragging the program out--no more than 60 minutes between heats; 3) level the playing field for all by standardizing propellers, then skid fins, etc. so that the race is truly competitive for all, not just a one or two boat contest.  If the H1 people want to bring fans back, including the younger audience, they HAVE to make the program shorter and more competitive.  Only the "old timer diehards" like you and I, will continue to come if they refuse to update the show.  If they don't they will continue to lose paying customers and race sites!  H1 never publishes paid attendance, but I'm willing to bet all that the trend is DOWN!

Philip Lampman said:

It is becoming increasingly apparent to me that:

 

We're all too close to the sport and seem to be trying to preserve the things we like to the exclusion of the changes that might be required to make it prosper. I admit I'd love nothing more than to turn back the clock, have a picnic on the shores of the Lake (or river, or bay.. whatever) with no admission fee and listen to the roar of piston-powered open cockpit, round nose hydroplanes. It ain't gonna happen... You can't go home again

 

But wait! There's more to this than I might have given serious thought. (and to be sure, I am not about to offer the definitive solution here) A lot of what I'm reading in these posts reminds me, as an old Ferrari, Porsche, Corvette, Cobra and - truthfully -  an MG, Triumph and Corvair kind of guy, that perhaps what we need to do is not so much try to bring our sport into the 21st century, but to figure out some way to get what we seem to want as a part of a comprehensive program.

 

In other words, why not keep the tradition and rich history (okay, and noise) of the old boats alive by making them a part of a total weekend event? Or even a stand alone event?  Yes, I know I'm not the first to think of this, but I'm reminded of the Monterey Historic Automobile Races, a vision put to practice by one Steven Earle. When I first started attending this annual event in the late 70s, it was a very clubby sort of an affair where people with old race cars for which no class remained, could have the opportunity to take them on the track and blow out the cobwebs, while allowing enthusiasts like myself to enjoy the sounds of old V-12s and the sight of famous old cars.

 

I'm starting to see seeds of a similar resurgence in the increasing attention to the vintage events, sanctioned by APBA and with promotional efforts by communities like Chelan's "Mahogany and Merlot" celebration and the recent Diamond Cup Revival/Regatta in Couer d'Alene.

 

I don't even suggest I have a plan for this, but I can say, from years of attendance, that the Monterey Historics Weekend has probably become the most attended weekend event on the Monterey Penninsula. (warts and all). It has grown to the point, to paraphrase Mr Berra, "It's become so crowded, no body goes there anymore".

 

So, just an idea, based on what I've seen develop. Perhaps it might be the historic elements of our sport that ought to be supporting or paying tribute to the modern version. Maybe we should build on the current vintage revival, make that the feature - including not only unlimiteds, but 7-Liters, the Y-class 48's, the 280s, et al.

 

Then as part of the program, roll out - or float out I suppose - some examples of the current crop of 200MPH+ unlimiteds as part of a special presentation, rather than have the vintage boats be a small adjunct to the H1 races?

 

Maybe we've been thinking this whole idea backwards. Let H1 get on with their business without them trying to figure out or plan for some way to pay homage to the old boats - especially at the newer venues (Qatar, China..) where I suspect most people couldn't care less about them. 

 

In other words, let's let H1 get on with their dynamic sport and let those of us who would rather have thunder and history take center stage (and, with I suppose APBA) figure out how to grow the vintage aspects of boat racing alone. We may be spending too much time and effort trying to put the two groups into harmony to the conflicting and counter-productive efforts of both.

 

Just my opinion...This is a forum,right? Maybe somebody should give Steve Earle a call to find out how he made the Monterey Historics such a great event.....

 

Philip, that's some aggressive thinking ... and great thought leadership. What it would require is a governing body, and (obviously) corporate sponsorship. But you're right -- rather than think nationally, it should be a regional affair that's designed with a business model that makes it scaleable, so that it could be expanded our of the Northwest if it succeeds.

 

There are now or soon will be enough vintage Unlimiteds in the Northwest to justify a small circuit of Seattle, Coeur d'Alene, Tri-Cities, and Chelan, perhaps even Kelowna (though that's likely nostalgia and not reality talking). How robust is the vintage limited fleet in our region? The Midwest and New York state do well with vintage events that don't include Unlimiteds, and perhaps a NW circuit could be augmented with vintage 7-litres and such.

 

I'd love to hear what someone like David Smith, a successful businessman who's also succeeded in Unlimited and vintage show-car circles, thinks about the viability of the idea. Fun to ponder, if nothing else!

Philip,

 

I appreciate your thoughts and I, too, love the old boats.  My website, nostalgicunlimiteds.com, I think is a testament to that.  But my concern is more the "state of the sport."  And I think the best scenario is one that combines the old and the new, to attract both the old and new fans of the sport.  I've had contact with so many people who "used to attend the boat races" but stopped years ago.  Some sited the noise, some tired of the "same guy (Budweiser) winning every year", and some just tired of the hassle.  But I think unlimited hydroplane racing is still a great motorsport that needs the support of all fans, past and present, if it is to survive and prosper.  And I think the people at H1 should be solicting the opinions of all in order to bring back those who no longer attend.  Indeed, the antique boating fraternity is intertwined in its history with Gold Cup racing, and the current venues would do well to invite them to be part of "race weekends", be it Seattle, Tri-Cities, or Detroit! 

Philip Lampman said:

Tim, I think you miss my point. What I'm trying to suggest here is to stop trying to combine the H1 Unlimited Events with the appearance of a few vintage exhibition laps. Let H1 get on with their own business and work to promote what, frankly is an exciting sport that needs some promotion and new venues.

 

Let's focus on the vintage events as stand-alone events. And i'm not just talking about unlimiteds. So what if a lot of of the old "U" boats are in Seattle. Thank god for that. So are a lot of the great limiteds, including the flatbottom racers, like Super Stocks, K-Boats, Cracker Boxes, and even drag boats. And why not make room for the outboards? I'm not suggesting we unveil an entire new nationwide series. Just try some things with the vintage boats and see what works.And let's make it part of a festival, with some commercial activities from local marinas, wineries and orchards and resorts...

 

Let's take what's already started, albeit in tentative steps, and support and help build on the events in Chelan and Couer d-Alene. Let's celebrate the old boats, make them part of an entire weekend festival at various venues and see what happens. Sure, you're right, many of the boats are out here in Seattle. For that reason alone I think we have the nucleus of a great concept.

 

Let me again refer to the Monterey Historics weekend. Were you thinking perhaps that all the vintage Ferraris, Bugattis, Alfas and Corvettes were garaged in Monterey? No, taking a page from the film "Field of Dreams", build it and they will come. If we need to build it in Seattle as a beginning, let's do it. Once there with nough interest in bringing back the old boats, I think the interest in them will grow and a lot of them will be rebuilt, restored and celebrated.

I realize that such a concept may not be what you had in mind when you made your original post and got this discussion started, but a lot of the ideas presented seem to suggest we need to somehow try to figure put how to gain new fans, but so many of the ideas also seem to suggest let's figure out how to do it without losing the elements of the sport so many of us grew up with. An honorable idea, but one I can't figure out how to satisfy.

 

So, again. let H1 get on with their own program, let minds brighter than my one, figure out how to make their sport successful and the rest of us simply get on with the things we seem to enjoy, the old boats, with all the noises and thrills and stories and legends that are part of the package.

 

Am I making any sense here? Let's begin in Seattle where we (I assume) have the greatest number of vintage boats, work toward building additional events - indeed festivals - in Chelan and elsewhere and go from there. The small, yet enthusiastic turnout of the vintage limiteds last October in Chelan, together with a wonderful turnout of old vintage runabouts made for a great weekend celebration.

 

Okay, I no longer have fingerprints... I'm going to bed.



Tim Matyn said:

Philip,

 

I love the vintage unlimiteds too, but, unfortunately, they are all based at the museum in Seattle, which doesn't help the events in Detroit, Madison, or the former Evansville thunder.

 

I still think the sport needs an overhaul: 1) make it a one day race as it always was before local groups tried to turn a 10 boat race into a two day event; 2) stop dragging the program out--no more than 60 minutes between heats; 3) level the playing field for all by standardizing propellers, then skid fins, etc. so that the race is truly competitive for all, not just a one or two boat contest.  If the H1 people want to bring fans back, including the younger audience, they HAVE to make the program shorter and more competitive.  Only the "old timer diehards" like you and I, will continue to come if they refuse to update the show.  If they don't they will continue to lose paying customers and race sites!  H1 never publishes paid attendance, but I'm willing to bet all that the trend is DOWN!

Philip Lampman said:

It is becoming increasingly apparent to me that:

 

We're all too close to the sport and seem to be trying to preserve the things we like to the exclusion of the changes that might be required to make it prosper. I admit I'd love nothing more than to turn back the clock, have a picnic on the shores of the Lake (or river, or bay.. whatever) with no admission fee and listen to the roar of piston-powered open cockpit, round nose hydroplanes. It ain't gonna happen... You can't go home again

 

But wait! There's more to this than I might have given serious thought. (and to be sure, I am not about to offer the definitive solution here) A lot of what I'm reading in these posts reminds me, as an old Ferrari, Porsche, Corvette, Cobra and - truthfully -  an MG, Triumph and Corvair kind of guy, that perhaps what we need to do is not so much try to bring our sport into the 21st century, but to figure out some way to get what we seem to want as a part of a comprehensive program.

 

In other words, why not keep the tradition and rich history (okay, and noise) of the old boats alive by making them a part of a total weekend event? Or even a stand alone event?  Yes, I know I'm not the first to think of this, but I'm reminded of the Monterey Historic Automobile Races, a vision put to practice by one Steven Earle. When I first started attending this annual event in the late 70s, it was a very clubby sort of an affair where people with old race cars for which no class remained, could have the opportunity to take them on the track and blow out the cobwebs, while allowing enthusiasts like myself to enjoy the sounds of old V-12s and the sight of famous old cars.

 

I'm starting to see seeds of a similar resurgence in the increasing attention to the vintage events, sanctioned by APBA and with promotional efforts by communities like Chelan's "Mahogany and Merlot" celebration and the recent Diamond Cup Revival/Regatta in Couer d'Alene.

 

I don't even suggest I have a plan for this, but I can say, from years of attendance, that the Monterey Historics Weekend has probably become the most attended weekend event on the Monterey Penninsula. (warts and all). It has grown to the point, to paraphrase Mr Berra, "It's become so crowded, no body goes there anymore".

 

So, just an idea, based on what I've seen develop. Perhaps it might be the historic elements of our sport that ought to be supporting or paying tribute to the modern version. Maybe we should build on the current vintage revival, make that the feature - including not only unlimiteds, but 7-Liters, the Y-class 48's, the 280s, et al.

 

Then as part of the program, roll out - or float out I suppose - some examples of the current crop of 200MPH+ unlimiteds as part of a special presentation, rather than have the vintage boats be a small adjunct to the H1 races?

 

Maybe we've been thinking this whole idea backwards. Let H1 get on with their business without them trying to figure out or plan for some way to pay homage to the old boats - especially at the newer venues (Qatar, China..) where I suspect most people couldn't care less about them. 

 

In other words, let's let H1 get on with their dynamic sport and let those of us who would rather have thunder and history take center stage (and, with I suppose APBA) figure out how to grow the vintage aspects of boat racing alone. We may be spending too much time and effort trying to put the two groups into harmony to the conflicting and counter-productive efforts of both.

 

Just my opinion...This is a forum,right? Maybe somebody should give Steve Earle a call to find out how he made the Monterey Historics such a great event.....

 

AT LEAST FOR SEAFAIR. WE NEED THE VINTAGE HYDROS TO RUN LIKE TRI-CITIES DOES. WHY ? SEATTLE HAS A LOT OF WHAT WE MAY CALL OLD-TIMERS MEANING A ALOT OF US GREW UP HERE AND KNOW HYDROPLANES AND LOVE THEM FROM ALMOST THE BEGINING OF OUR LIVES. ALSO MAYBE GET THE SHREIK TO HELP WITH SOME MONEY OR SPONSORSHIP. BRING HIS BIG BOATS OVER HERE. I DON'T KNOW BUT WE CAN NOT LOSE HYDROS OR SEAFAIR. IT'S ALSO A REUNION OF SCHOOLMATES. NEIGHBORS, FAMILY, AND PEOPLE FROM THE VALLEY.AND YES MOST OF THE TIME THE WEATHER IS PRIMO.SUNBURNS AND SUNTANS

Bob, yes, you are right. We need all of those things, but last years' "crisis" over a (mere?) $40,000 just to hold the races at all, doesn't give me great confidence vis-a-vis the vintage unlimiteds being part of the show. I hope they are, but, like the current field of Turbine boats, they cost a lot of money to run. At least the current H1 crop of competitors get something in the way of renumeration for their efforts. (although I'm guessing it must be something like spending a couple million dollars to race for $10,000 ourses)

So far as I know, (and I'm not privy to the costs of operating a vintage boat) the vintage guys either get nothing or just enough to meet expenses. Certainly there's no prize money to be had. It would be interesting to have a feel for what effect, financially, the vintage boats have on attendance and revenue? From what I read into Seafair's own survey, published last year, it appears more people are there for the air show than the boats, vintage or otherwise.

 

Is there really THAT much enthusiasm for the vintage boats? With all due respect to the Tri-Cities and Detroit, maybe Madison, Seattle is the capitol of Unlimited Hydroplane racing. I think this is the place with the enthusiasts (and the finest museum in the world dedicated to the sport) to find a way, but, personally, I don't want the old boats to seem like a charity that requires support. Last year tells me even the modern boats and the associated festival that is Seafair is in jeopardy of operating at a loss.

 

I think the vintage boats alone could make their own show. I agree that including some exhibition runs during the "Big" races is very cool, but I do not think the future of the sport may lie in the combining of the old with the new. Let H1 do its thing, and let's capitlize on that enthusiasm you express for the vintage boats and create a whole new stand alone festival. Maybe in conjunction with Seafair. Let's showcase the vintage boats on, say Saturday, include the limiteds and the flatbottom classes, make the old boats accessible to the (paying) crowds, perhaps even bringing back Mt Baker Park as the pit area for the vintage boats (thank you Jim McKeon - keep the faith). Let's return the H1 racing to one day - Sunday - and give over Saturday to the vintage boats. Not to mention the Blue Angels practice on Saturday too.

I do not believe the best solution to growing our sport is in the combining of the vintage boats with the modern boats on a common program. Based on the many responses to this forum, I'm inclined to think we may have two different groups of fans. Let's look for a - I am starting to dislike this term - win-win solution. Not a compromise.

 

Am I making sense or just rambling?

 

 



Bob Shaffer said:

AT LEAST FOR SEAFAIR. WE NEED THE VINTAGE HYDROS TO RUN LIKE TRI-CITIES DOES. WHY ? SEATTLE HAS A LOT OF WHAT WE MAY CALL OLD-TIMERS MEANING A ALOT OF US GREW UP HERE AND KNOW HYDROPLANES AND LOVE THEM FROM ALMOST THE BEGINING OF OUR LIVES. ALSO MAYBE GET THE SHREIK TO HELP WITH SOME MONEY OR SPONSORSHIP. BRING HIS BIG BOATS OVER HERE. I DON'T KNOW BUT WE CAN NOT LOSE HYDROS OR SEAFAIR. IT'S ALSO A REUNION OF SCHOOLMATES. NEIGHBORS, FAMILY, AND PEOPLE FROM THE VALLEY.AND YES MOST OF THE TIME THE WEATHER IS PRIMO.SUNBURNS AND SUNTANS

   Exposure. How many people do you talk to that are aware of the Thunderboats being repaired & driven???    Have we ever been on PBS  Channel 9 during the fund raiser?  We could man the phones & Dave could talk to the public.Pledge $125.00 & get a picture of a driver or a CD.

  John



John Leidle said:

   Exposure. How many people do you talk to that are aware of the Thunderboats being repaired & driven???    Have we ever been on PBS  Channel 9 during the fund raiser?  We could man the phones & Dave could talk to the public.Pledge $125.00 & get a picture of a driver or a CD.

  John



Bob Shaffer said:THAT'S GOOD IDEA


John Leidle said:

   Exposure. How many people do you talk to that are aware of the Thunderboats being repaired & driven???    Have we ever been on PBS  Channel 9 during the fund raiser?  We could man the phones & Dave could talk to the public.Pledge $125.00 & get a picture of a driver or a CD.

  John

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